April 09, 2014

Calculating Velocity FAQ

By Rachel Davies

Sometimes people get confused about velocity and edge cases of what gets counted or not. It doesn't matter greatly except it helps to do this consistently over time. I wrote a FAQ for our teams because these edge cases come up infrequently and developers often don't remember what rule to apply. I'm sharing a slightly abbreviated version of our Velcoty FAQ as an illustration of working agreements around this. Your team might choose to do this differently and that's okay.

April 09, 2014 11:41 AM

Manage Your Job Search is Out; You Get the Presents

By Johanna Rothman

I am happy to announce that Manage Your Job Search is available on all platforms: electronic and print. And, you get the presents!

For one week, I am running a series of special conference calls to promote the book. Take a look at my celebration page.

I also have special pricing on Hiring Geeks That Fit as a bundle at the Pragmatic Bookshelf, leanpub, and on Amazon. Why? Because you might want to know how great managers hire.

Please do join me on the conference calls. They’ll be short, sweet, and a ton of fun.

April 09, 2014 11:28 AM

April 07, 2014

Estimates Considered Useful

By Rachel Davies

Despite the current #NoEstimates trend, at Unruly we still estimate our user stories. The way we do this is in small informal meetings in our development area . Why do we find this useful? Because estimates of development costs inform decisions on what to develop next.

April 07, 2014 10:30 AM

April 03, 2014

Who Solves Which Problems?

By Johanna Rothman

Many years ago, I was part of a task force to “standardize” project management at an organization. I suggested we gather some data to see what kinds of projects the client had.

They had short projects, where it was clear what they had to do: 1-3 week projects where 2-4 people could run with the requirements and finish them. They had some of what they called “medium-risk, medium return” projects, where a team or two of people needed anywhere from 3-9 months to work on features that were pretty well defined. But they still needed product managers to keep working with the teams. And, they had the “oh-my-goodness, bet the company” projects and programs. Sometimes, they started with a small team of 2-5 people to do a proof-of-concept for these projects/programs. Then, they staffed those projects or programs with almost everyone. (BTW, this is one of the reasons I wrote Manage It! Your Guide to Modern, Pragmatic Project Management. Because one size approach to each project does not fit all!)

The management team wanted us, the task force, to standardize on one project management approach.

In the face of the data, they relented and agreed it didn’t make sense to standardize.

It made a little sense to have some guidelines for some project governance, although I didn’t buy that. I’ve always preferred deliverable-based milestones and iterative planning. When you do that, when you see project progress in the form of demos and deliverables, you don’t need as much governance.

There are some things that might make sense for a team to standardize on—those are often called team norms. I’m all in favor of team norms. They include what “done” means. I bet you’re in favor of them, too!

But, when someone else tells you what a standard for your work has to be? How does that feel to you?

I don’t mind constraints. Many of us live with schedule constraints. We live with budget constraints. We live with release criteria. In regulated industries, we have a whole set of regulatory constraints. No problem. But how to do the work? I’m in favor of the teams deciding how to do their own work.

That’s the topic of this month’s management myth, Management Myth 28: I Can Standardize How Other People Work.

If you think you should tell other people how to do their work, ask yourself why. What problem are you trying to solve? Is there another way you could solve that problem? What outcome do you desire?

In general, it’s a really good idea for the people who have the problem to solve the problem. As long as they know it’s a problem.

How about you tell the team the outcome you desire, and you let them decide how to do their work?

April 03, 2014 03:37 PM